Research Bites is back in November!

We’re looking forward to returning in November! We hope you can join us for the following sessions on the theme of Information seeking.

Top 5 OneSearch Tips
Tuesday 10th November, 12.00, Bowland North SR 19
Hear about these essential tips for making the most of the Library’s discovery tool.
Tanya Williamson, Academic Liaison Librarian, Library

Getting the best out of Web of Science
Thursday 12th November, 12.00, Bowland North SR 19
New to Web of Science, or perhaps returning to it after a while? Let the expert guide you through!
Jenny Brine, Academic Liaison Librarian, Library

Insider tips for searching PubMed
Thursday 19th November, 12.00 Bowland North SR 19
Learn about the advanced features of this huge and popular biomedical and life sciences database.
Jenny Brine, Academic Liaison Librarian, Library

Finding company information
Friday 20th November, 12.00 Bowland North SR 15
A quick guide to finding company and market information.
Andy Holgate, Academic Liaison Librarian, Library

New database highlight: Scopus
Tuesday 24th November, 12.00, Bowland North SR 11
An introduction to the key features of this vast citations database from Elsevier.
Tanya Williamson, Academic Liaison Librarian, Library

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More than your h-index

Again, to those who came to this Research Bites session called More than your h-index?, which was all about author bibliometrics, many thanks for staying for a slightly longer than advertised session, and for taking part in the interesting discussions that were sparked by the presentation.

The slides are available here:

Follow on information:

Does the h-index only cover journal articles? This actually varies from source to source, and also what the h-index is in relation to. Theoretically you can use any type of work that accrues citations and calculate the h-graph based on that. Citation databases such as Scopus and Web of Science may not include every document an author has published as they have deliberate coverage policies (Scopus’ Content Coverage is available in detail. Web of Science coverage depends on your subscription and the h-index will vary accordingly). The h-index is calculated based on the items listed in the results list in either database, the majority of which are likely to be journal articles and conference proceedings. If there are letters, editorials etc in the list, they will be included, though items that were not cited at all will not affect the h-index.

Are patents covered? Although patents can be found through Scopus they are not included in the h-index. Patents (and many other things) are excluded from Google Scholar’s metrics coverage.

Thomson Reuters (prop. Web of Science) do have a product called Derwent Innovations Index, which allows patent searching and citation analysis of patents. (Possibly an interesting paper describing the h-index for patents by Jian Cheng Guan and Xia Gao).

Bang those Robots’ Heads together

Thanks to those of you who attended the Introduction to Citation Analysis at the start of July. The session was longer than advertised, and I appreciated you staying until the end!

The session covered:

  • What is citation analysis
  • What is it for?
  • How do I analyse citations? – Web of Science and Scopus
  • What’s wrong with citation analysis?

The slides are available here:

and if you wish, you can watch the full recording of the session. NB. Recordings work best using any browser other than Google Chrome.

Research Bites in July

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This month’s theme is Research metrics.

Join us for an informal 20 minute session. Just turn up, no need to book.

‘Bang those robot heads together’
Thursday 9th July, 12.00. Bowland North SR 19
A brief introduction to the citation analysis tools available in Web of Science and Scopus.
Tanya Williamson, Assistant Librarian, Library

The Journal Impact Factor
Monday 13th July, 12.00. Bowland North SR 19
Understand the importance of Journal Impact Factors for you, the University and your funding body. Discover the most common metrics, and address your concerns.
Jenny Brine, Subject Librarian, Library

More than your h-index?
Thursday 16th July, 12.00. Bowland North SR 19
Learn about the range of tools/metrics that you can use to help understand the impact of your work.
Tanya Williamson, Assistant Librarian, Library

Altmetrics: beyond the impact factor
Tuesday 21st July, 12.00. Bowland North SR 19
A look at altmetrics and article-level metrics, and their growing significance to researchers.
Hardy Schwamm, Research Data and Repository Manager, Library

The power of SciVal
Thursday 23rd July, 12.00. Bowland North SR 19
An overview of this powerful research evaluation tool will be of interest to researchers and research managers.
Masud Khokhar, Head of Digital Innovation, Library

From database search to writing

Thank you to Dr Steve Wright for his very insightful session looking at a workflow that takes the researcher on a cyclical, digital journey from searching the literature to writing a thesis/paper.

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The introductory slides are available here: 20150415 Research Bites – from database to writing, and the recording will be available to watch soon.

The session was based on the assumption that the researcher is searching, reading, note-taking, managing documents, and writing digitally, potentially using multiple devices, such as laptops and tablets/iPads.

Most of the examples used Web of Science and Endnote Web, and Endnote for iPad, which are tightly integrated. Most databases and search tools, such as OneSearch and Google Scholar, also facilitate ‘pushing’ references to Endnote and other reference management tools.

When it comes to annotating and highlighting text in PDFs, Steve mentioned doing this within Endnote, or using other apps such as Good Reader, which allow you to export your notes.

For more intensive textual and qualitative analysis, Steve briefly introduces atlas.ti, which he’ll look at more next Thursday’s session. This software allows you to code your notes, effectively creating data out of your reading…

Questions

Why would I use Web of Science rather than Google Scholar? Yes Google Scholar does have very broad coverage, and quick indexing which is done by automated web crawlers. It’s great for broadening your search beyond journal literature into grey literature, conferences and websites. Web of Science on the other hand is a well-established, complex bibliographic database that indexes 12,000 ‘high impact’ journals and has much more sophisticated search functions, indexing (e.g.. subject categories, refining features) and citation data.

Does using Endnote for iPad and storing PDFs in your Endnote library fill up your iPad with PDFs? PDFs are not automatically synced to your iPad, so you only tap and download the ones you want to read at the time.

Can you unattach/delete PDFs from your Endnote references? Yes there is an option to delete the PDF.

Can I get Endnote to work on my Mac? This handy Lancaster Answer tells you how.