Scopus: Time-saving tips for navigating peer-reviewed academic literature

Thanks to Caroline Gibson, Academic Liaison Librarian, for giving a great presentation on some less well-know features of Scopus, one of the largest abstracting and indexing databases of academic literature available.

Apologies for the late start to those of you streaming in online.

The recording of Scopus: Time-saving tips for navigating peer-reviewed academic literature is now available.

The demo focused on:

  • Search tricks specific to Scopus
  • Analysing results
  • Personalised features such as alerts, lists and saved searches
  • Bulk download of PDFs

Search tricks specific to Scopus

In Scopus there are two types of phrase search:

  • fuzzy phrase with double quotes, e.g. “palm oil” will return the two words, their plurals and UK/US alternative spellings together, in any order.
  • Exact phrase with curly brackets, e.g. {Elaeis guineensis} will return the phrase as you type it. It’s not case sensitive, but will include hyphens, and will restrict to results with these words in this order only.

Analysing results

Caroline demonstrated using the ‘Analyze results’ feature once you have conducted a search. This feature allows you to visually gain insights into your topic such as:

  • publication trends
  • top authors
  • journal (or source) titles publishing on this topic
  • countries and institutions publishing on this topic

Scopus‘s strength is that data is linked throughout the database, so you can explore articles, citations, authors, journal titles etc in more detail just by clicking.

Use the ‘Find it’ button to check OneSearch for the full text.

Personalised features such as alerts, lists and saved searches

It is recommended that you create an account with Scopus (and all Library databases) to access the personalised features.

You can keep up to date with the literature by setting up email alerts:

  • When new results that match your search are published
  • When your favourite journal brings out an new issue
  • When an eminent author publishes a new article, or is cited
  • When a key article is cited

There are also ‘Lists’ to organise your saved results, and ‘Saved searches’ to revisit your saved searches. You can even just view new results since you last ran the search to save you trawling the whole list again!

Download of PDFs

This features elicited the first ever Wow! moment in Research Bites history!

Researchers were impressed to see that Scopus allows you to download full text PDFs – where available – directly to a folder on your computer. It even names them for you in a helpful format.

This is in addition to exporting results to reference manager such as EndNote, .

There are specific systems settings required for the bulk download of PDFs, which you can find in the Scopus help.

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Introducing Scopus

Thanks to those who attended the Research Bites session Introducing Scopus’ last week. Unfortunately the session was not recorded on this occasion. The following features were demonstrated following the introductory slides.

Introductory slides20151124 Research Bites-Introducing Scopus

  • Document search
  • Author search
  • Affiliation search
  • Brief look of citation analysis tools and metrics such as citation counts, publishing trends and h-index

Scopus provide useful help and tutorials, details of coverage and short videos, such as this one.

Questions

Do documents published while at previous institutions appear in an author’s publication list? Yes. All items in Scopus linked to an author will appear in their document list, regardless of the research organisation they were affiliated to at the time. However they will only appear in the document list of the affiliated research organisation, which makes acknowledgement of affiliation more important than ever.

Does the Library support the use of SciVal, Elsevier’s research intelligence tool? No, not currently.

Research Bites is back in November!

We’re looking forward to returning in November! We hope you can join us for the following sessions on the theme of Information seeking.

Top 5 OneSearch Tips
Tuesday 10th November, 12.00, Bowland North SR 19
Hear about these essential tips for making the most of the Library’s discovery tool.
Tanya Williamson, Academic Liaison Librarian, Library

Getting the best out of Web of Science
Thursday 12th November, 12.00, Bowland North SR 19
New to Web of Science, or perhaps returning to it after a while? Let the expert guide you through!
Jenny Brine, Academic Liaison Librarian, Library

Insider tips for searching PubMed
Thursday 19th November, 12.00 Bowland North SR 19
Learn about the advanced features of this huge and popular biomedical and life sciences database.
Jenny Brine, Academic Liaison Librarian, Library

Finding company information
Friday 20th November, 12.00 Bowland North SR 15
A quick guide to finding company and market information.
Andy Holgate, Academic Liaison Librarian, Library

New database highlight: Scopus
Tuesday 24th November, 12.00, Bowland North SR 11
An introduction to the key features of this vast citations database from Elsevier.
Tanya Williamson, Academic Liaison Librarian, Library

More than your h-index

Again, to those who came to this Research Bites session called More than your h-index?, which was all about author bibliometrics, many thanks for staying for a slightly longer than advertised session, and for taking part in the interesting discussions that were sparked by the presentation.

The slides are available here:

Follow on information:

Does the h-index only cover journal articles? This actually varies from source to source, and also what the h-index is in relation to. Theoretically you can use any type of work that accrues citations and calculate the h-graph based on that. Citation databases such as Scopus and Web of Science may not include every document an author has published as they have deliberate coverage policies (Scopus’ Content Coverage is available in detail. Web of Science coverage depends on your subscription and the h-index will vary accordingly). The h-index is calculated based on the items listed in the results list in either database, the majority of which are likely to be journal articles and conference proceedings. If there are letters, editorials etc in the list, they will be included, though items that were not cited at all will not affect the h-index.

Are patents covered? Although patents can be found through Scopus they are not included in the h-index. Patents (and many other things) are excluded from Google Scholar’s metrics coverage.

Thomson Reuters (prop. Web of Science) do have a product called Derwent Innovations Index, which allows patent searching and citation analysis of patents. (Possibly an interesting paper describing the h-index for patents by Jian Cheng Guan and Xia Gao).

Bang those Robots’ Heads together

Thanks to those of you who attended the Introduction to Citation Analysis at the start of July. The session was longer than advertised, and I appreciated you staying until the end!

The session covered:

  • What is citation analysis
  • What is it for?
  • How do I analyse citations? – Web of Science and Scopus
  • What’s wrong with citation analysis?

The slides are available here:

and if you wish, you can watch the full recording of the session. NB. Recordings work best using any browser other than Google Chrome.

Research Bites in July

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This month’s theme is Research metrics.

Join us for an informal 20 minute session. Just turn up, no need to book.

‘Bang those robot heads together’
Thursday 9th July, 12.00. Bowland North SR 19
A brief introduction to the citation analysis tools available in Web of Science and Scopus.
Tanya Williamson, Assistant Librarian, Library

The Journal Impact Factor
Monday 13th July, 12.00. Bowland North SR 19
Understand the importance of Journal Impact Factors for you, the University and your funding body. Discover the most common metrics, and address your concerns.
Jenny Brine, Subject Librarian, Library

More than your h-index?
Thursday 16th July, 12.00. Bowland North SR 19
Learn about the range of tools/metrics that you can use to help understand the impact of your work.
Tanya Williamson, Assistant Librarian, Library

Altmetrics: beyond the impact factor
Tuesday 21st July, 12.00. Bowland North SR 19
A look at altmetrics and article-level metrics, and their growing significance to researchers.
Hardy Schwamm, Research Data and Repository Manager, Library

The power of SciVal
Thursday 23rd July, 12.00. Bowland North SR 19
An overview of this powerful research evaluation tool will be of interest to researchers and research managers.
Masud Khokhar, Head of Digital Innovation, Library