Open Research in February

Research Bites in February is about Open Research. Come along to a session to learn about where to publish your open research data, how to make your publications open access, and some of the practicalities of the Open Research agenda: using Pure to record your research outputs; and using ResearchFish for RCUK-funded researchers.

February’s programme

Where can I publish my research data?
Wednesday 1st February, 12pm, Bowland North SR1. Live stream at 12.00 GMT.
Look at the key considerations about which services you can trust with your research data. We will also demo two major cross-subject data repositories: Figshare and Zenodo.
Hardy Schwamm, Research Data & Repository Manager

ResearchFish for researchers
Monday 6th February, 12pm, Bowland North SR1. Live stream at 12.00 GMT
This session is aimed at explaining the purpose behind the ResearchFish submission, who must submit and get a quick demo of the system or ask any questions you might currently have.
Claire Tinker-Mill, Research System Administrator, Research & Contracts Support Office (RCSO).

ResearchFish for funded students
Monday 13th February, 12pm, Bowland North SR1. Live stream at 12.00 GMT
Don’t know what the pesky emails are all about? Come along and learn what ResearchFish for funded PG students are all about, and why making a submission can make a difference.
Claire Tinker-Mill, Research System Administrator, Research & Contracts Support Office (RCSO).

What is Pure and why should I use it?
Friday 17th February, 12pm, Bowland North SR1. Live stream at 12.00 GMT
Get an overview of Pure, the University’s research information system.
Claire Tinker-Mill, Research System Administrator, Research & Contracts Support Office (RCSO).

How can I make my research open access?
Monday 20th February, 12pm, Bowland North SR1. Live stream at 12.00 GMT
Learn about different open access options, including adding your research outputs to Pure, the University’s research information system.
Claire Tinker-Mill, RCSO & Louise Tripp, Open Access Manager, Library.

Live streaming

We are still trialling live streaming and trying to get the service right, so apologies to anyone who has had issues connecting. Please leave feedback on December’s sessions on this survey.

Live stream links are now behind a University log in page to make them more secure.

Feedback

If you have any other feedback or ideas about Research Bites topics, the live streaming, or the presentations, please email us at academicliaison[at]lancaster.ac.uk.

Advertisements

Research impact: recordings of sessions this month

We’re half way through July’s Research Bites programme, focusing on Research Impact.

The sessions have been really well attended, which is great to see as it’s clearly a topic on many people’s minds. Apologies to those who came and found it a little bit of a squash, or who couldn’t get a hot drink because the water ran out so quickly!

Thanks go to Amy Gibbons, Jacqueline Young and Ross Dachraoui, who have delivered three informative sessions so far.

Recordings

The recordings of these sessions are now available to Lancaster University members:

All of the recordings are available from the Recordings archive where available. Most of these are available to all.

Sessions remaining this month

We have 4 more sessions remaining in this theme:

Today

Proactive partnerships for impact

Tuesday 19th July, 12pm, Bowland North SR 19
Co-designing productive impact driven research.
Nick King & Colin McLaughlin, Business Partnerships Team, Faculty of Science and Technology

Later this week

Recording impact using Pure

Thursday 21st July, 12pm, Bowland North SR 19
Use the University Research Information System, Pure, to record your research impact.
Claire Tinker-Mill, Research System Administrator, Research Services

Next week

Measuring academic impact using citations and bibliometrics

Tuesday 26th July, 12pm, Bowland North SR 4
Learn how citations and bibliometrics can be used to indicate academic impact.
Tanya Williamson, Academic Liaison Librarian, Library

What SciVal can tell us about academic impact

Thursday 28th July, 12pm, Bowland North SR 4
Learn how this powerful research analytics tool can give you insights into academic impact.
Masud Khokhar, Head of Digital Innovation, Library

Research Impact in July

July’s Research Bites programme is all about Research Impact. Just turn up, no need to book!

REF Impact 101

Monday 4th July, 12pm, Bowland North SR 19
An overview of what is considered ‘research impact’ according to the new Research Excellence Framework (REF), and what is eligible for submission.
Amy Gibbons, Faculty Impact Manager, Faculty of Science & Technology

Collecting and curating impact evidence

Thursday 7th July, 12pm, Bowland North SR 19
Why it’s important to gather evidence of research impact, identifying what constitutes evidence, and how best to collate and store it.
Jacqueline Young, Impact Officer, Research Services

Writing ‘Pathways to Impact’ statements

Wednesday 13th July, 12pm, Bowland North SR 19
What they are, why they’re important, and some tips on best practice.
Ross Dachraoui, Impact Officer, Research Services

Proactive partnerships for impact

Tuesday 19th July, 12pm, Bowland North SR 19
Co-designing productive impact driven research.
Nick King & Colin McLaughlin, Business Partnerships Team, Faculty of Science and Technology

Recording impact using Pure

Thursday 21st July, 12pm, Bowland North SR 19
Use the University Research Information System, Pure, to record your research impact.
Claire Tinker-Mill, Research System Administrator, Research Services

Measuring academic impact using citations and bibliometrics

Tuesday 26th July, 12pm, Bowland North SR 4
Learn how citations and bibliometrics can be used to indicate academic impact.
Tanya Williamson, Academic Liaison Librarian, Library

What SciVal can tell us about academic impact

Thursday 28th July, 12pm, Bowland North SR 4
Learn how this powerful research analytics tool can give you insights into academic impact.
Masud Khokhar, Head of Digital Innovation, Library

February’s Research Bites: Open Research at Lancaster

First of all, apologies for the slightly delayed release of February’s programme! Hope you can make it to some or all of these practical sessions on making Open Research happen at Lancaster University.

As always, anyone who is involved in conducting or supporting research at Lancaster University is welcome. Just turn up, no need to book.

We try to record all sessions using Panopto, and make the recordings available in the recordings archive.

Tea and coffee and a piece of cake is provided!

What you need to know about Open Access
Tuesday 2nd February, 12.00, Bowland North SR 15
Learn why Open Access is important, and how the Library can help you through it.
Louise Tripp, Open Access Manager, Library

Where can I publish my open research data?
Thursday 4th February, 12.00, Bowland North SR 4
Look at the key considerations about which services you can trust with your research data. We will also demo two major cross-subject data repositories: Figshare and Zenodo.
Hardy Schwamm, Research Data & Repository Manager, Library

What is Pure, and why should I use it?
Tuesday 9th February, 12.00, Bowland North SR 3
Get an overview of Pure, the University’s research information system.
Claire Tinker-Mill, Research System Administrator, Research & Contracts Support Office.

Updating your Pure Profile and other content
Friday 19th February, 12.00, Bowland North SR 15
A short demo about how to manage your profile on the University’s research information system.
Claire Tinker-Mill, Research System Administrator, Research & Contracts Support Office.

Adding Open Access Publications to Pure
Monday 22nd February, 12.0, Bowland North SR 5
Improve access to your research by learning how to add your open access research outputs to Pure, the University’s research information system.
Claire Tinker-Mill, Research System Administrator, Research & Contracts Support Office.

Photo Credit: biblioteekje via Compfight cc

eTheses at Lancaster: a guide to submitting an electronic thesis

Many thanks to Louise Tripp and Annette Lawrence from the Library for delivering the useful session on eThesis submission recently.

Panopto_Logo  In case you missed it, you can now view the recording.

The Library website also provides guidance:

Questions

Are outputs uploaded to Pure searchable from outside the institutional repository? Yes, Google indexes the contents of Pure/ePrints.

During the session, Louise referred to HEFCE’s future requirements for making research open access so that it would count towards the post-2014 REF. Is it necessary to upload research conducted in previous employment at other institutions?  The policy will apply from 1 April 2016 to accepted journal articles/conference proceedings with ISSN so Lancaster researchers would have to deposit and make it Open Access from that point to count towards the post-2014 REF. They wouldn’t have to make research open access retrospectively.

What you need to know about Open Access

OAlogo

Thank very much to Louise Tripp for the recent session about Open Access, which included an overview of the movement, and the terminology and processes involved in publishing Open Access journal articles.

Panopto_Logo

The recording of the session is now available, or you can simply view the slides below.

Questions

Is it the author that pays the Article Processing Charge (APC) to publishers? If you are funded my a research council, the RCUK has provided a block of funding which you can use to pay APCs. The University also provides some money for those who are not funded by a Research Council.

If I am allowed to self-archive by depositing onto Pure, does that mean I can also store a copy on ResearchGate? You would need to check the publisher’s terms, using Sherpa/FACT and Sherpa/ROMEO to find out what your funder requires and what the journal title allows. For example, you may be advised that self-archiving the author’s post-print on your own website after an embargo period of 6 months is permitted, but you can’t assume this means you can upload a copy to ResearchGate, as some publishers (e.g. Elsevier) would consider this ‘Systematic distribution‘. Please look at the publisher’s terms carefully and contact them if it’s not clear.

If I’ve already been published can I just put that version into Pure (i.e. Green route to OA)? You would need to check which version can be self-archived, and whether there is still an embargo in force.

Do many journals restrict self-archiving? Only a handful restrict self-archiving of the author’s post-print, but many do apply long embargoes.

If I apply for Gold funding and there’s no money left, what happens? This is unlikely at the moment due to the block grant from RCUK, but the University may have to apply tighter guidelines in the future if this becomes a problem e.g. only research considered to be 3 or 4 star for the REF

What you need to know about Open Access

Thank you to Louise Tripp for delivering today’s Research Bites session on Open Access (OA). If you missed it, or would like to look at the slides again, we’ve made them available on SlideShare.

The detailed guide to Open Access is the first place to find out more about making your research Open Access. There’s comprehensive information about the two routes: Gold and Green, how to access funding for OA, where to self-archive, and more.