Open Research in February

Research Bites in February is about Open Research. Come along to a session to learn about where to publish your open research data, how to make your publications open access, and some of the practicalities of the Open Research agenda: using Pure to record your research outputs; and using ResearchFish for RCUK-funded researchers.

February’s programme

Where can I publish my research data?
Wednesday 1st February, 12pm, Bowland North SR1. Live stream at 12.00 GMT.
Look at the key considerations about which services you can trust with your research data. We will also demo two major cross-subject data repositories: Figshare and Zenodo.
Hardy Schwamm, Research Data & Repository Manager

ResearchFish for researchers
Monday 6th February, 12pm, Bowland North SR1. Live stream at 12.00 GMT
This session is aimed at explaining the purpose behind the ResearchFish submission, who must submit and get a quick demo of the system or ask any questions you might currently have.
Claire Tinker-Mill, Research System Administrator, Research & Contracts Support Office (RCSO).

ResearchFish for funded students
Monday 13th February, 12pm, Bowland North SR1. Live stream at 12.00 GMT
Don’t know what the pesky emails are all about? Come along and learn what ResearchFish for funded PG students are all about, and why making a submission can make a difference.
Claire Tinker-Mill, Research System Administrator, Research & Contracts Support Office (RCSO).

What is Pure and why should I use it?
Friday 17th February, 12pm, Bowland North SR1. Live stream at 12.00 GMT
Get an overview of Pure, the University’s research information system.
Claire Tinker-Mill, Research System Administrator, Research & Contracts Support Office (RCSO).

How can I make my research open access?
Monday 20th February, 12pm, Bowland North SR1. Live stream at 12.00 GMT
Learn about different open access options, including adding your research outputs to Pure, the University’s research information system.
Claire Tinker-Mill, RCSO & Louise Tripp, Open Access Manager, Library.

Live streaming

We are still trialling live streaming and trying to get the service right, so apologies to anyone who has had issues connecting. Please leave feedback on December’s sessions on this survey.

Live stream links are now behind a University log in page to make them more secure.

Feedback

If you have any other feedback or ideas about Research Bites topics, the live streaming, or the presentations, please email us at academicliaison[at]lancaster.ac.uk.

Scholarly publishing and open access

Thanks to Louise Tripp, Academic Liaison Librarian and Open Access Manager, for a very informative Research Bites session covering the essential considerations relating to scholarly publishing and open access.

The recording is now available (headphones recommended), as are the slides from the presentation (PDF).

Understand what’s required by policy

HEFCE, Lancaster University, and many funders such as Research Councils and Wellcome Trust have open access policies. Make sure you understand what is expected of you.

Choose your publication route

Follow the simple advice on Think. Check. Submit to decide if a journal is trustworthy.

The publication flowchart (PDF) will help you to understand the different routes to open access – green and gold.

Submit your manuscript

  • Acknowledge source of funding in your manuscript
  • Identify where and how associated data can be accessed via a
    data access statement
  • Acknowledge your affiliation to Lancaster University
  • Consider Author Rights before signing agreements

Create a record in Pure

Register your research output in Pure, deposit your Author
Accepted Manuscript within 3 months of acceptance.

Contact us for help

If you have questions at any stage, please contact openaccess@lancaster.ac.uk for advice.

February’s Research Bites: Open Research at Lancaster

First of all, apologies for the slightly delayed release of February’s programme! Hope you can make it to some or all of these practical sessions on making Open Research happen at Lancaster University.

As always, anyone who is involved in conducting or supporting research at Lancaster University is welcome. Just turn up, no need to book.

We try to record all sessions using Panopto, and make the recordings available in the recordings archive.

Tea and coffee and a piece of cake is provided!

What you need to know about Open Access
Tuesday 2nd February, 12.00, Bowland North SR 15
Learn why Open Access is important, and how the Library can help you through it.
Louise Tripp, Open Access Manager, Library

Where can I publish my open research data?
Thursday 4th February, 12.00, Bowland North SR 4
Look at the key considerations about which services you can trust with your research data. We will also demo two major cross-subject data repositories: Figshare and Zenodo.
Hardy Schwamm, Research Data & Repository Manager, Library

What is Pure, and why should I use it?
Tuesday 9th February, 12.00, Bowland North SR 3
Get an overview of Pure, the University’s research information system.
Claire Tinker-Mill, Research System Administrator, Research & Contracts Support Office.

Updating your Pure Profile and other content
Friday 19th February, 12.00, Bowland North SR 15
A short demo about how to manage your profile on the University’s research information system.
Claire Tinker-Mill, Research System Administrator, Research & Contracts Support Office.

Adding Open Access Publications to Pure
Monday 22nd February, 12.0, Bowland North SR 5
Improve access to your research by learning how to add your open access research outputs to Pure, the University’s research information system.
Claire Tinker-Mill, Research System Administrator, Research & Contracts Support Office.

Photo Credit: biblioteekje via Compfight cc

Publishing with IEEE

We were pleased to welcome Julia Stockdale who represents IEEE to the University at the end of February. She delivered a useful presentation on why and how to publish with IEEE. The recording will be available soon.

Although IEEE stands for Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers, it publishes on a very wide range of subject areas where technology is applied.

IEEEsubjects

It is an enormous, prestigious society which publishes 170+ journal titles and provides papers from 1400+ conferences annually.

Julia mentioned the IEEE Author Digital Toolbox which provides you with comprehensive guidance for submitting papers to the IEEE.

One guide to highlight:

The How to Write for Technical Periodicals & Conferences Guide – in English

The How to Write for Technical Periodicals & Conferences Guide – in Chinese

There are some other recordings of similar, but more detailed sessions delivered by IEEE members and editors.

Part 1: Overview & Publishing Options from IEEE

Part 2: Audience & Paper Structure

Part 3: Ethics, Where to Publish, Open Access & Impact Factor

Part 4: Using IEEE Xplore and Other Author Tools

What you need to know about Open Access

OAlogo

Thank very much to Louise Tripp for the recent session about Open Access, which included an overview of the movement, and the terminology and processes involved in publishing Open Access journal articles.

Panopto_Logo

The recording of the session is now available, or you can simply view the slides below.

Questions

Is it the author that pays the Article Processing Charge (APC) to publishers? If you are funded my a research council, the RCUK has provided a block of funding which you can use to pay APCs. The University also provides some money for those who are not funded by a Research Council.

If I am allowed to self-archive by depositing onto Pure, does that mean I can also store a copy on ResearchGate? You would need to check the publisher’s terms, using Sherpa/FACT and Sherpa/ROMEO to find out what your funder requires and what the journal title allows. For example, you may be advised that self-archiving the author’s post-print on your own website after an embargo period of 6 months is permitted, but you can’t assume this means you can upload a copy to ResearchGate, as some publishers (e.g. Elsevier) would consider this ‘Systematic distribution‘. Please look at the publisher’s terms carefully and contact them if it’s not clear.

If I’ve already been published can I just put that version into Pure (i.e. Green route to OA)? You would need to check which version can be self-archived, and whether there is still an embargo in force.

Do many journals restrict self-archiving? Only a handful restrict self-archiving of the author’s post-print, but many do apply long embargoes.

If I apply for Gold funding and there’s no money left, what happens? This is unlikely at the moment due to the block grant from RCUK, but the University may have to apply tighter guidelines in the future if this becomes a problem e.g. only research considered to be 3 or 4 star for the REF

Open Access

During the session on ‘What you need to know about Open Access’ we had some questions, which we’ll try to clarify here.

Can self-funded researchers get help to publish through the Gold Open Access (OA) route?
Researchers who are self-funded can apply for Lancaster University Open Access funding once your article has been accepted. Alternatively you can use the Green route by depositing in an Institutional or subject repository, but you need to check SHERPA/RoMEO whether the journal publisher permits this.

Can you clarify HEFCE’s policy on Open Access publication in relation to the REF (Research Excellence Framework)?
HEFCE’s Circular 07/2014 gives a good overview of this new policy which states that:

“to be eligible for submission to the post-2014 REF, outputs must have been deposited in an institutional or subject repository on acceptance for publication, and made open-access within a specified time period. This requirement applies to journal articles and conference proceedings only; monographs and other long-form publications, research data and creative and practice-based research outputs are out of scope. Only articles and proceedings accepted for publication after 1 April 2016 will need to fulfil these requirements, but we would strongly urge institutions to implement the policy now. The policy gives a further list of cases where outputs will not need to fulfil the requirements.”

I’m not the principal author, but would like to publish through the Gold route. What should I do?
If there is a principal author of your research output, they should apply for any available funding from their own Institution. If you work in collaboration and there is no principal author you can apply for funding to you Head of Department.

What you need to know about Open Access

Thank you to Louise Tripp for delivering today’s Research Bites session on Open Access (OA). If you missed it, or would like to look at the slides again, we’ve made them available on SlideShare.

The detailed guide to Open Access is the first place to find out more about making your research Open Access. There’s comprehensive information about the two routes: Gold and Green, how to access funding for OA, where to self-archive, and more.