Research Ethics in March and April

We’re pleased to announce a new theme on Research Ethics. The University’s Ethics Team will be presenting three brand new sessions, so please come along to learn about the ethics process, common considerations, and ask questions.

Ethical review at Lancaster University – an overview.

Tuesday 21st March, 12pm, Bowland North SR03.
This overview will help researchers understand the university’s current ethics processes which were introduced last summer. It will also provide valuable advice about where to find materials and guidance for preparing ethics applications.
Lancaster University Research Ethics Team

Ethical collection of research data; if it’s out there can I use it?

Tuesday 4th April, 12pm, Bowland North SR03.
This session will consider the ethical implications of a variety of data collection methods.
Lancaster University Research Ethics Team

What’s the Difference? Ethics at Lancaster University – Common themes and FAQs.

Tuesday 25th April, 12pm, Bowland North SR03.
In this session we will look at a variety of common themes within ethics applications and frequently asked questions.
Lancaster University Research Ethics Team

As always, just turn, no need to book.

Correction: Where can I publish my research data?

The eagle-eyed among you may have noticed that the date for this session didn’t quite add up. Here’s what we meant to say:

Where can I publish my research data?

Wednesday 1st February, 12pm, Bowland North SR1. Live stream at 12.00 GMT.
Look at the key considerations about which services you can trust with your research data. We will also demo two major cross-subject data repositories: Figshare and Zenodo.
Hardy Schwamm, Research Data & Repository Manager

Hope to see you there.

Open Research in February

Research Bites in February is about Open Research. Come along to a session to learn about where to publish your open research data, how to make your publications open access, and some of the practicalities of the Open Research agenda: using Pure to record your research outputs; and using ResearchFish for RCUK-funded researchers.

February’s programme

Where can I publish my research data?
Wednesday 1st February, 12pm, Bowland North SR1. Live stream at 12.00 GMT.
Look at the key considerations about which services you can trust with your research data. We will also demo two major cross-subject data repositories: Figshare and Zenodo.
Hardy Schwamm, Research Data & Repository Manager

ResearchFish for researchers
Monday 6th February, 12pm, Bowland North SR1. Live stream at 12.00 GMT
This session is aimed at explaining the purpose behind the ResearchFish submission, who must submit and get a quick demo of the system or ask any questions you might currently have.
Claire Tinker-Mill, Research System Administrator, Research & Contracts Support Office (RCSO).

ResearchFish for funded students
Monday 13th February, 12pm, Bowland North SR1. Live stream at 12.00 GMT
Don’t know what the pesky emails are all about? Come along and learn what ResearchFish for funded PG students are all about, and why making a submission can make a difference.
Claire Tinker-Mill, Research System Administrator, Research & Contracts Support Office (RCSO).

What is Pure and why should I use it?
Friday 17th February, 12pm, Bowland North SR1. Live stream at 12.00 GMT
Get an overview of Pure, the University’s research information system.
Claire Tinker-Mill, Research System Administrator, Research & Contracts Support Office (RCSO).

How can I make my research open access?
Monday 20th February, 12pm, Bowland North SR1. Live stream at 12.00 GMT
Learn about different open access options, including adding your research outputs to Pure, the University’s research information system.
Claire Tinker-Mill, RCSO & Louise Tripp, Open Access Manager, Library.

Live streaming

We are still trialling live streaming and trying to get the service right, so apologies to anyone who has had issues connecting. Please leave feedback on December’s sessions on this survey.

Live stream links are now behind a University log in page to make them more secure.

Feedback

If you have any other feedback or ideas about Research Bites topics, the live streaming, or the presentations, please email us at academicliaison[at]lancaster.ac.uk.

In November: Information seeking and management

Research Bites is back in November on the theme of Information seeking and management. These short, informal lunchtime sessions aim to deliver useful, practical information to researchers, and give you the chance to ask questions. More about Research Bites.

New live webcast

There is no need to register, just turn up. If you are not based in Lancaster, you can now watch a live stream of the session at 12.00 GMT by following the links below. Sessions will also be recorded and made available via the Recordings archive.

Top 5 time-saving tips for OneSearch

Wednesday 9th November, 12pm, Bowland North SR15. Live stream at 12.00 GMT.
Hear about these essential tips for making the most of the Library’s discovery tool.
Tanya Williamson, Academic Liaison Librarian, Library

Get better at literature searching

Wednesday 16th November, 12pm, Bowland North SR3. Live stream at 12.00 GMT
Learn how to tackle the most common literature searching problems.
Tanya Williamson, Academic Liaison Librarian, Library

Scopus: Time-saving tips for navigating peer-reviewed academic literature

Friday 18th November, 12pm, Bowland North SR3. Live stream at 12.00 GMT
Learn how to save searches, quickly analyse and download full-text results and take advantage of current awareness features including alerts.
Caroline Gibson, Academic Liaison Librarian, Library

Scholarly publishing and open access: things to consider

Monday 21st November, 12pm, Bowland North SR9. Live stream at 12.00 GMT
Get an introduction to the benefits of open access publishing, and learn about the available funding.
Louise Tripp, Academic Liaison Librarian and Open Access Manager, Library

Research data management: things to consider

Thursday 24th November, 12pm, Bowland North SR1. Live stream at 12.00 GMT
Learn about the best practice when it comes to managing your research data.
Hardy Schwamm, Research Data & Repository Manager, Library.

As always, tea and coffee and something sweet will be provided.

Research Bites is back in November 2016

Thanks

Sincere thanks to all of the presenters and participants of Research Bites this last year! It has been a successful year, with 130 people attending one or more sessions, notching up 211 attendances.

Careers

Special thanks to colleagues in Careers who attracted 55 participants to 5 sessions in August and September. You can find out about their other events and job opportunities by logging into Lancaster Target Connect.

Elaine Davies based her session ‘Getting your first lecturing job‘ on the findings of a report undertaken by AGCAS, the Association of Graduate Careers Advisory Services.

Recordings

You can revisit sessions that you missed or want to experience again by browsing the titles in the Recordings Archive. In August we trialled live streaming of the recording, which means more of our research staff and students can benefit from the sessions.

Research Bites in 2016-17

Research Bites will resume in November 2016. As yet the programme hasn’t been devised, but you can expect to see topics on:

  • Information seeking
  • Information management
  • Research data and infrastructure
  • Scholarly publishing
  • Researcher profiles
  • Intellectual Property, copyright and enterprise
  • Research funding and resources
  • Research impact and metrics
  • Careers

We’ll be looking into making a Moodle area for Research Bites in the future to make the programme, materials and recordings more accessible for University members.

Feedback

We hope that every session you have attended or presented has helped you in some way. If you’d like to send any feedback about what you’ve learned, a connection you’ve made or something you have done differently as a result of attending a Research Bites session, please send it to us using this form:

 See you in November!

Research Bites in August/September: Careers

Apologies for the very late arrival of this month’s Research Bites programme.

This month we’re focusing on Careers. The sessions are generally aimed at PhDs, post-docs and early career researchers, but everyone who is interested is welcome!

Just turn up, tea/coffee and cake, as always!

CV tips for PhDs

Thursday 4th August, 12pm, Bowland North SR1
This session will cover the format of an academic CV, a traditional CV and show examples of both.
Kathryn Morey-Scarfe & David Mashiter, Careers & Employment Advisers, Careers

Finding your first research job

Thursday 11th August, 12pm, Bowland North SR1
This session will identify the key resources to assist you in finding your first researcher position.
Kathryn Morey-Scarfe & Kirsty Thornton, Careers & Employment Adviser and Careers Consultant, Careers

Getting your first lecturing job

Monday 22nd August, 12pm, Bowland North SR1
Gain insight into the steps you could take to increase your chances of securing your first lecturing post., based on the results of a recent survey of 172 academic staff, from 22 UK universities.
Elaine Davies, Careers Consultant, Faculty of Arts and Social Science

Succeeding at interviews

Thursday 25th August 12pm, Bowland North SR1
How to prepare for academic job interviews, hints and tips on how to succeed and common academic interview questions.
Kathryn Morey-Scarfe, Careers & Employment Adviser, Careers

The importance of networking for early career researchers

Thursday 1st September, 12pm, Bowland North SR8
Learn why building your professional network is important as a researcher, and understand what you’re looking to achieve, what you have to offer, and how you can make the most of your network.
Shelley Morgan, Careers & Employment Adviser, Careers

Recordings, where available, will be linked from the Recordings Archive.

Filing a patent and commercialising your research

Many thanks to Gavin Smith, Intellectual Property Development Manager from Research & Enterprise Services, who delivered a clear and informative session about filing patents, and how the University can support researchers wishing to apply for, and license patents based on their research.

Patents are formal (i.e. registered) intangible assets which give the holder a short term monopoly.

Why patent?

  • A validation that research is “novel” and “inventive”
  • A door-opener to external organisations
  • May return impact case studies
  • May return industrial income
  • May return licensing income

The complete slides are available here, courtesy of the presenter: 20160308_ResearchBites_Patents_GJSmith

Lancaster University researchers have been granted many patents. You can browse a selection on the Research & Enterprise webpage.

A granted patent confirms that the research covered is world-leading, industrially applicable, and totally novel and inventive.

Questions

If I give a talk (e.g. at a conference or in the department) and reveal an invention, perhaps in the abstract, would this be considered ‘prior art’? Yes it could, so be careful about how much you reveal, and crucially when you reveal it.

Does the Research & Enterprise Office provide template disclosures? Gavin will work with you to compose the disclosure, so please seek advice early on when considering patents.

Do patents just reward novelty? No, patents also need to demonstrate an ‘inventive step’, not just novelty. They also need to be eligible, and capable of industrial application.

Intellectual Property Office

The UK Intellectual Property Office gives comprehensive advice on patents.

Encyclopædia Britannica ImageQuest, “Otto’s Patent,” accessed 16 Mar 2016,
http://quest.eb.com/search/115_2750042/1/115_2750042/cite