Open Research in February

Research Bites in February is about Open Research. Come along to a session to learn about where to publish your open research data, how to make your publications open access, and some of the practicalities of the Open Research agenda: using Pure to record your research outputs; and using ResearchFish for RCUK-funded researchers.

February’s programme

Where can I publish my research data?
Wednesday 1st February, 12pm, Bowland North SR1. Live stream at 12.00 GMT.
Look at the key considerations about which services you can trust with your research data. We will also demo two major cross-subject data repositories: Figshare and Zenodo.
Hardy Schwamm, Research Data & Repository Manager

ResearchFish for researchers
Monday 6th February, 12pm, Bowland North SR1. Live stream at 12.00 GMT
This session is aimed at explaining the purpose behind the ResearchFish submission, who must submit and get a quick demo of the system or ask any questions you might currently have.
Claire Tinker-Mill, Research System Administrator, Research & Contracts Support Office (RCSO).

ResearchFish for funded students
Monday 13th February, 12pm, Bowland North SR1. Live stream at 12.00 GMT
Don’t know what the pesky emails are all about? Come along and learn what ResearchFish for funded PG students are all about, and why making a submission can make a difference.
Claire Tinker-Mill, Research System Administrator, Research & Contracts Support Office (RCSO).

What is Pure and why should I use it?
Friday 17th February, 12pm, Bowland North SR1. Live stream at 12.00 GMT
Get an overview of Pure, the University’s research information system.
Claire Tinker-Mill, Research System Administrator, Research & Contracts Support Office (RCSO).

How can I make my research open access?
Monday 20th February, 12pm, Bowland North SR1. Live stream at 12.00 GMT
Learn about different open access options, including adding your research outputs to Pure, the University’s research information system.
Claire Tinker-Mill, RCSO & Louise Tripp, Open Access Manager, Library.

Live streaming

We are still trialling live streaming and trying to get the service right, so apologies to anyone who has had issues connecting. Please leave feedback on December’s sessions on this survey.

Live stream links are now behind a University log in page to make them more secure.

Feedback

If you have any other feedback or ideas about Research Bites topics, the live streaming, or the presentations, please email us at academicliaison[at]lancaster.ac.uk.

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Scholarly publishing and open access

Thanks to Louise Tripp, Academic Liaison Librarian and Open Access Manager, for a very informative Research Bites session covering the essential considerations relating to scholarly publishing and open access.

The recording is now available (headphones recommended), as are the slides from the presentation (PDF).

Understand what’s required by policy

HEFCE, Lancaster University, and many funders such as Research Councils and Wellcome Trust have open access policies. Make sure you understand what is expected of you.

Choose your publication route

Follow the simple advice on Think. Check. Submit to decide if a journal is trustworthy.

The publication flowchart (PDF) will help you to understand the different routes to open access – green and gold.

Submit your manuscript

  • Acknowledge source of funding in your manuscript
  • Identify where and how associated data can be accessed via a
    data access statement
  • Acknowledge your affiliation to Lancaster University
  • Consider Author Rights before signing agreements

Create a record in Pure

Register your research output in Pure, deposit your Author
Accepted Manuscript within 3 months of acceptance.

Contact us for help

If you have questions at any stage, please contact openaccess@lancaster.ac.uk for advice.

In November: Information seeking and management

Research Bites is back in November on the theme of Information seeking and management. These short, informal lunchtime sessions aim to deliver useful, practical information to researchers, and give you the chance to ask questions. More about Research Bites.

New live webcast

There is no need to register, just turn up. If you are not based in Lancaster, you can now watch a live stream of the session at 12.00 GMT by following the links below. Sessions will also be recorded and made available via the Recordings archive.

Top 5 time-saving tips for OneSearch

Wednesday 9th November, 12pm, Bowland North SR15. Live stream at 12.00 GMT.
Hear about these essential tips for making the most of the Library’s discovery tool.
Tanya Williamson, Academic Liaison Librarian, Library

Get better at literature searching

Wednesday 16th November, 12pm, Bowland North SR3. Live stream at 12.00 GMT
Learn how to tackle the most common literature searching problems.
Tanya Williamson, Academic Liaison Librarian, Library

Scopus: Time-saving tips for navigating peer-reviewed academic literature

Friday 18th November, 12pm, Bowland North SR3. Live stream at 12.00 GMT
Learn how to save searches, quickly analyse and download full-text results and take advantage of current awareness features including alerts.
Caroline Gibson, Academic Liaison Librarian, Library

Scholarly publishing and open access: things to consider

Monday 21st November, 12pm, Bowland North SR9. Live stream at 12.00 GMT
Get an introduction to the benefits of open access publishing, and learn about the available funding.
Louise Tripp, Academic Liaison Librarian and Open Access Manager, Library

Research data management: things to consider

Thursday 24th November, 12pm, Bowland North SR1. Live stream at 12.00 GMT
Learn about the best practice when it comes to managing your research data.
Hardy Schwamm, Research Data & Repository Manager, Library.

As always, tea and coffee and something sweet will be provided.

February’s Research Bites: Open Research at Lancaster

First of all, apologies for the slightly delayed release of February’s programme! Hope you can make it to some or all of these practical sessions on making Open Research happen at Lancaster University.

As always, anyone who is involved in conducting or supporting research at Lancaster University is welcome. Just turn up, no need to book.

We try to record all sessions using Panopto, and make the recordings available in the recordings archive.

Tea and coffee and a piece of cake is provided!

What you need to know about Open Access
Tuesday 2nd February, 12.00, Bowland North SR 15
Learn why Open Access is important, and how the Library can help you through it.
Louise Tripp, Open Access Manager, Library

Where can I publish my open research data?
Thursday 4th February, 12.00, Bowland North SR 4
Look at the key considerations about which services you can trust with your research data. We will also demo two major cross-subject data repositories: Figshare and Zenodo.
Hardy Schwamm, Research Data & Repository Manager, Library

What is Pure, and why should I use it?
Tuesday 9th February, 12.00, Bowland North SR 3
Get an overview of Pure, the University’s research information system.
Claire Tinker-Mill, Research System Administrator, Research & Contracts Support Office.

Updating your Pure Profile and other content
Friday 19th February, 12.00, Bowland North SR 15
A short demo about how to manage your profile on the University’s research information system.
Claire Tinker-Mill, Research System Administrator, Research & Contracts Support Office.

Adding Open Access Publications to Pure
Monday 22nd February, 12.0, Bowland North SR 5
Improve access to your research by learning how to add your open access research outputs to Pure, the University’s research information system.
Claire Tinker-Mill, Research System Administrator, Research & Contracts Support Office.

Photo Credit: biblioteekje via Compfight cc

Focus on open researchers

Vitae‘s focus at the moment is developing the ‘Open Researcher‘, and they have produced some really useful materials both for researchers, and those involved in researcher development.

They are also advertising the Vitae Connections: Open Researchers CPD event in Leeds on the 1st December 2015.


This event will provide information, practical advice and opportunity for discussion around topics, including:

  • Researchers’ perceptions of ‘open’ – feedback from the recent #vitaechat
  • How does open access change behaviours? Helen Blanchett, Jisc
  • Implications for researcher development from the changing culture of research,  Professor Stephen Curry, Imperial College London
  • Engaging the public throughout the research lifecycle, Derek Stewart OBE, National Institute for Health Research
  • A personal experience of developing the open researcher, Dr Rob Daley, Heriot-Watt University
  • And more…

If you haven’t done so already, it’s well worth exploring Vitae’s resources and events. You may or may not know that Research Bites is mapped against the Researcher Development Framework which was developed by Vitae.

Data Citation: what you need to know

Hardy Schwamm, Research Data and Repository Manager, delivered an interesting and informative session on the emerging area of data citation.

Why data citation is important. Data underpins the arguments in an article, therefore it is just as important. Citing data, and making it easily accessible means that research is reproducible, and can more efficiently be built on by others. or can be verified, and can be built on more efficiently by others. It is a Common Principle of Research Councils UK (RCUK) that research data are a public good and more and more funding bodies expect you to share data as openly as possible.

How data citation works. This is evolving, and there are not yet clear standards. Data citations are similar to bibliographic citations, but would ideally include a “persistent identifier” such as a digital object identifier (DOI) which links directly to the dataset. You may have seen DOIs when looking at journal articles online e.g. 10.1145/1515693.1515696 or sometimes presented as a link e.g. http://dx.doi.org/10.5255/UKDA-SN-6899-1

DataCite recommends that data citations contain the following details:

  • Creator (Publication Year): Title. Version. Publisher.  Resource Type. Identifier

Example:

What is a digital object identifier (DOI)? It is a unique and persistent link to a digital object. The organisation DataCite are concerned with assigning DOIs to research data and other outputs. Institutions, such as Lancaster University, can also be granted the ability to ‘mint’ their own DOIs. We can now provide a DOI for datasets that are deposited into Pure.

Tools to help with data citation: 

  • DOI Citation formatter (Beta)
  • Endnote includes a reference type ‘Dataset’ which you can use to cite data.

Thomson Reuters who produce Web of Science now publish a Data Citation Index, though the University does not currently subscribe.

Questions

The consent forms I have been advised to use state that the data I collect from participants should not be kept for more than 10 years. How can I reconcile that with a persistent DOI, that will potentially last ‘forever’? The DOI is persistent, but the contents linked to from the DOI can change. After 10 years there could be a message to say something like ‘this data is no longer available as participants consented to make the data available for 10 years’. The responsibility for this would lie with the institution who issued the DOI.

Should researchers add an additional clause to their consent forms about data sharing? You may have good reasons why data cannot be made available, though anonymised data is usually acceptable to participants and ethics committees. Some funders (e.g. ESRC) already stipulate consent forms to allow sharing of anonymised data. It is best to check. If you are self-funded, it is up to you to follow good research practice, and seek advice.

 

 

 

eTheses at Lancaster: a guide to submitting an electronic thesis

Many thanks to Louise Tripp and Annette Lawrence from the Library for delivering the useful session on eThesis submission recently.

Panopto_Logo  In case you missed it, you can now view the recording.

The Library website also provides guidance:

Questions

Are outputs uploaded to Pure searchable from outside the institutional repository? Yes, Google indexes the contents of Pure/ePrints.

During the session, Louise referred to HEFCE’s future requirements for making research open access so that it would count towards the post-2014 REF. Is it necessary to upload research conducted in previous employment at other institutions?  The policy will apply from 1 April 2016 to accepted journal articles/conference proceedings with ISSN so Lancaster researchers would have to deposit and make it Open Access from that point to count towards the post-2014 REF. They wouldn’t have to make research open access retrospectively.