Intellectual Property and Enterprise in May

May’s theme will be Intellectual Property and Enterprise.
Join us for an informal 20 minute session. Just turn up, no need to book. Tea/coffee and cake provided.

Licensing your work with Creative Commons
Thursday 4th May, 12.00, Bowland North SR 3. Live stream
Creative Commons licences and how they communicate what others can do with your work.
Lorna Pimperton, Academic Liaison Librarian & Copyright Officer, Library

Filing and commercialising a patent based on your research
Monday 8th May, 12.00, Bowland North SR 3
Using patents to generate impact and revenue from your research.
Gavin Smith, Intellectual Property Development Manager, Research and Enterprise Services

Using copyright material in your research. 
Wednesday 10th May, 12.00, Bowland North SR 3. Live stream
What to do about third party copyright in your thesis or research output, and how to navigate the grey area of ‘fair dealing’.
Lorna Pimperton, Academic Liaison Librarian & Copyright Officer, Library

Trademarks, design rights and copyright
Thursday 11th May, 12.00, Bowland North SR 3
Expert advice on intellectual property rights, other than patents, for your invention or research output.
Gavin Smith, Intellectual Property Development Manager, Research and Enterprise Services

Starting a spin-out company from your research. 
Monday 22nd May, 12.00, Bowland North SR 3.
Expert advice on forming a university company, running a company and obtaining finance.
Gavin Smith, Intellectual Property Officer, Research and Enterprise Services

How do I engage with business, and get industry partnerships?
Wednesday 31st May, 12.00, 12.00, Bowland North SR 3. Live stream
A look at how to gain more meaningful and productive relationships with external partners and how be proactive in forming successful collaborative research partnerships.
Nick King/Colin McLaughlin, Business Partnerships Team, Faculty of Science and Technology

Research Ethics: Ethical review – an overview

Firstly, many thanks to Becky Case, Debbie Knight and Diane Hopkins for the interesting and informative Research Bites session on the Ethics approval process at Lancaster University.

Secondly, apologies to anyone who had hoped to stream in or watch a recording. Research Bites in March and April will not be recorded/streamed. The LU Ethics Team have kindly shared the slides from this session.

Lancaster University Ethics Committees

There are now three Faculty-focused Ethics Committees which deal with the majority of Ethics applications, and report to the University Research Ethics Committee (UREC). Some applications are referred to UREC, but most are dealt with at these committees.

The webpages are full of useful information about the process, including supporting documentation and contact details.

Ethics approval process

Depending on the complexity of the ethical considerations, applications can be turned around in a couple of weeks, e.g. when there has been prior approval, a month or two e.g. if the full committee needs to decide, or even go on for much longer.

Delays can happen when:

  • the researcher doesn’t supply enough information
  • the researcher doesn’t start the process early enough, or at all, or
  • the approval needs to be referred to other committees which only meet at certain times

The overwhelming message was to consider first whether ethical approval is needed at all, and second, get in touch with the Research Ethics Officers early on.

Ethical mindset

The presentation and discussion recognised that while Research Ethics approval can be – and unfortunately, sometimes is – seen as a series of hoops to jump through before cracking on with the research, it is in fact an integral part of the research design process. In developing the ethics approval application, the researcher is considering:

  • recruitment of participants
  • informed consent from participants
  • research methodology
  • potential risk to the researcher and/or participants
  • policies from the University, funder and even publishers

Questions

There were many interested questions asked during the session, though the majority of answers seemed to be that each case is different. Something that seems simple om the surface can reveal itself to be quite ‘high risk’. However, while alarm bells may ring, that is by no means a reason that the research cannot take place. Rather the researcher will need to consider how, for example, participants could be made aware of the sensitivity nature of the study, or an appropriate way to understand the research and give/refuse consent.

  • How long is approval likely to take?
  • Is there such a thing as retrospective ethics approval?
  • Can one application cope with different ethical risks/considerations, e.g. human participants and lone working? (Yes)
  • Are any groups e.g. children or disabled people considered ‘vulnerable’?
  • Should I apply for ethics before contacting prospective participants, e.g. a teaser for recruitment, or scoping out organisations to work with?

If you have similar questions, please get in touch with the Research Ethics Officers.

Research Bites update: March and April

The next Research Bites theme will be Research Ethics, and will be presented by the Lancaster University Ethics Team: Debbie Knight, Diane Hopkins and Rebecca Case.

There will be tea, coffee and something sweet to eat as usual. As always, just turn, no need to book.

Ethical review at Lancaster University – an overview.

Tuesday 21st March, 12pm, Bowland North SR03.
This overview will help researchers understand the university’s current ethics processes which were introduced last summer. It will also provide valuable advice about where to find materials and guidance for preparing ethics applications.
Lancaster University Research Ethics Team

Ethical collection of research data; if it’s out there can I use it?

Tuesday 4th April, 12pm, Bowland North SR03.
This session will consider the ethical implications of a variety of data collection methods.
Lancaster University Research Ethics Team

What’s the Difference? Ethics at Lancaster University – Common themes and FAQs.

Tuesday 25th April, 12pm, Bowland North SR03.
In this session we will look at a variety of common themes within ethics applications and frequently asked questions.
Lancaster University Research Ethics Team

Please note: these sessions will not be recorded or streamed. Apologies to anyone who was hoping to tune in. We’ll post a write up after the sessions.

Research Ethics in March and April

We’re pleased to announce a new theme on Research Ethics. The University’s Ethics Team will be presenting three brand new sessions, so please come along to learn about the ethics process, common considerations, and ask questions.

Ethical review at Lancaster University – an overview.

Tuesday 21st March, 12pm, Bowland North SR03.
This overview will help researchers understand the university’s current ethics processes which were introduced last summer. It will also provide valuable advice about where to find materials and guidance for preparing ethics applications.
Lancaster University Research Ethics Team

Ethical collection of research data; if it’s out there can I use it?

Tuesday 4th April, 12pm, Bowland North SR03.
This session will consider the ethical implications of a variety of data collection methods.
Lancaster University Research Ethics Team

What’s the Difference? Ethics at Lancaster University – Common themes and FAQs.

Tuesday 25th April, 12pm, Bowland North SR03.
In this session we will look at a variety of common themes within ethics applications and frequently asked questions.
Lancaster University Research Ethics Team

As always, just turn, no need to book.

Correction: Where can I publish my research data?

The eagle-eyed among you may have noticed that the date for this session didn’t quite add up. Here’s what we meant to say:

Where can I publish my research data?

Wednesday 1st February, 12pm, Bowland North SR1. Live stream at 12.00 GMT.
Look at the key considerations about which services you can trust with your research data. We will also demo two major cross-subject data repositories: Figshare and Zenodo.
Hardy Schwamm, Research Data & Repository Manager

Hope to see you there.

Open Research in February

Research Bites in February is about Open Research. Come along to a session to learn about where to publish your open research data, how to make your publications open access, and some of the practicalities of the Open Research agenda: using Pure to record your research outputs; and using ResearchFish for RCUK-funded researchers.

February’s programme

Where can I publish my research data?
Wednesday 1st February, 12pm, Bowland North SR1. Live stream at 12.00 GMT.
Look at the key considerations about which services you can trust with your research data. We will also demo two major cross-subject data repositories: Figshare and Zenodo.
Hardy Schwamm, Research Data & Repository Manager

ResearchFish for researchers
Monday 6th February, 12pm, Bowland North SR1. Live stream at 12.00 GMT
This session is aimed at explaining the purpose behind the ResearchFish submission, who must submit and get a quick demo of the system or ask any questions you might currently have.
Claire Tinker-Mill, Research System Administrator, Research & Contracts Support Office (RCSO).

ResearchFish for funded students
Monday 13th February, 12pm, Bowland North SR1. Live stream at 12.00 GMT
Don’t know what the pesky emails are all about? Come along and learn what ResearchFish for funded PG students are all about, and why making a submission can make a difference.
Claire Tinker-Mill, Research System Administrator, Research & Contracts Support Office (RCSO).

What is Pure and why should I use it?
Friday 17th February, 12pm, Bowland North SR1. Live stream at 12.00 GMT
Get an overview of Pure, the University’s research information system.
Claire Tinker-Mill, Research System Administrator, Research & Contracts Support Office (RCSO).

How can I make my research open access?
Monday 20th February, 12pm, Bowland North SR1. Live stream at 12.00 GMT
Learn about different open access options, including adding your research outputs to Pure, the University’s research information system.
Claire Tinker-Mill, RCSO & Louise Tripp, Open Access Manager, Library.

Live streaming

We are still trialling live streaming and trying to get the service right, so apologies to anyone who has had issues connecting. Please leave feedback on December’s sessions on this survey.

Live stream links are now behind a University log in page to make them more secure.

Feedback

If you have any other feedback or ideas about Research Bites topics, the live streaming, or the presentations, please email us at academicliaison[at]lancaster.ac.uk.